Athens Eye Care

Athens Eye Care
1137 Cedar Shoals Dr
Athens, GA 30605
Phone: (706) 353-2119
Fax: (706) 369-0631
EyeCareAthens@gmail.com
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Play Ball! Eye Care Tips for Athletes

Posted by on Apr 16, 2014 in Blog, Children | 0 comments

First thing’s first: Happy Sports Eye Safety Awareness Month! Everyone needs to protect their eyesight on a regular basis, but athletes in particular need to take protective measures as many popular sports, like baseball, basketball, football, soccer, and golf, have a high risk of eye injury. Each year over 100,000 children visit physicians due to eye injuries, according to the National Eye Institute. Here are few tips from Dr. Kinard’s office on how kids and their parents and coaches can help keep the eyes out of danger while playing sports. Protective Sports Eyewear About 20% of kids wear corrective lenses, which means the vast majority of kids may not have ever had an eye exam or conversation with an optometrist. As a result, many kids playing sports may not be aware of the importance of protective sports eyewear, the risks involved with sports, or the available products to help keep eyes safe. Studies by the American Pediatric Association (APA) have shown that athletes who wear protective eyewear result in fewer head and face injuries than those with no protection. One suggestion from the Coalition to Prevent Sports Eye Injuries is to reach out to coaches and athletic directors to disseminate information regarding eye injury risks and preventive measures. We encourage parents to ask coaches to share information about eye risks with their athletes and to advocate all sports participants to wear protective eyewear. So what kinds of protective eyewear are available for sports? Badminton Sports goggles with polycarbonate lenses Baseball Polycarbonate face guard or other certified safe protection attached to helmet for batting and base running; sports goggles with polycarbonate lenses for fielding Basketball Sports goggles with polycarbonate lenses Bicycling (low eye risk) Sturdy streetwear frames with polycarbonate lenses Fencing Full face cage Field Hockey Sports goggles with polycarbonate lenses; face mask for goalie Football Polycarbonate shield on helmet Handball Sports goggles with polycarbonate lenses Ice hockey Helmet and full face protection Lacrosse Helmet and full face protection Racquetball Sports goggles with polycarbonate lenses Soccer Sports goggles with polycarbonate lenses Softball Fielding: Sports goggles with polycarbonate lenses; Batting/Base Running: Polycarbonate face guard Squash Sports goggles with polycarbonate lenses Street...

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7 Ways to Help Kids Love their New Glasses

7 Ways to Help Kids Love their New Glasses

Posted by on Nov 6, 2013 in Blog, Children | 0 comments

Wearing eyeglasses for the first time can be a startling change at first. Understanding and dealing with change is hard for everyone, but it can be particularly difficult for children. Parents can make the adjustment period go by more smoothly by following these helpful hints: 1. Explain that wearing glasses is not a defect but a necessary part of good health. Social messages have a big impact on how we think about our appearance, and even very young children are not exempt from the message that glasses are “nerdy” or “dorky”. Children can have a hard time accepting new eyeglasses if they do not understand why they are important. Stress the health benefits of good vision in child-friendly, easy-to-understand terms.   2. Let your child pick out his or her own frames. Glasses can be a fashion statement and an expression of personal style. Letting your child pick out his or her own frames instills a sense of ownership and pride. Look through magazines together to pick out colors and styles that are appealing. You can even turn it into a craft project, where you make a collage of possible options before going to the vision center. Do not rush your child and allow them to try on many types of frames before making the final selection.     3. Teach them the real-world benefits of clear vision. Take a trip to a museum, art gallery, or a bookstore to show your child the positive benefits of corrective lenses. Have them observe the world with and without their new glasses and talk about the differences they see. Spending extra time with a parent doing special activities can also help kids work through any negative feelings they have about their new change in appearance. 4. Encourage your child to look for role models who also wear glasses. Look through magazines, browse online, and talk to friends and family members who also wear eyeglasses. Show your child that people from all walks of life, even celebrities like Katy Perry, benefit from wearing corrective lenses. Have them play reporter and interview a friend or family member about their own experiences with glasses...

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Reading is Seeing

Reading is Seeing

Posted by on Oct 2, 2013 in Blog, Children | 0 comments

Diagnosing Learning-related Vision Problems in Children From Harry Potter to Shakespeare, reading is one of the fundamental skills we learn in school, and for many it is a lifelong passion. Not to mention, in our increasingly fast-paced, technological world, it’s important to keep up with all those texts and emails. Yet for some of us, reading can be a chore, even for the best and brightest. When it comes to our young ones, reading problems can often be directly related to learning problems. What many people do not realize is that the underlying problem could be related to their vision. Symptoms of Learning-Related Vision Problems Do you notice your son squinting or putting his head close to the book when reading? Does your daughter complain about headaches, rubbing her eyes? Do you find your children easily losing attention during visual tasks, or avoiding reading and close work altogether? Do you experience any of these problems yourself? If so, you or your children may be experiencing Learning-related Vision Problems. Learning-Related Vision Problems Defined If your child passes the school vision test, you may think that he or she is in the clear. Unfortunately, these tests often do not always account for the types of vision problems that interfere with reading. As the American Optometric Association explains, what these screenings test for is “visual acuity.” In simpler terms, visual acuity is the ability to see objects clearly at a distance. However, there are many other visual skills that these tests do not assess, such as Visual Fixation, Binocular Fusion, and Convergence, all of which are crucial to reading and other activities in the classroom. In fact, you may have 20/20 vision and still have vision problems. The only way to thoroughly assess one’s vision is through a comprehensive eye examination. Effects of Leaving Vision Problems Untreated While Learning-Related Vision Problems and Learning Disabilities are not the same thing, the two are undoubtedly linked. Experts estimate that 20 to 25% of children experience vision problems that affect academic performance, and that rate can be as high as 30-60% for those diagnosed with a learning disability. Children with Learning-Related Vision Problems may experience...

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